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Windows version of Canvas generates flawed JPEG files

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  • Windows version of Canvas generates flawed JPEG files

    I just submitted the following to ACD tech support:

    After upgrading to Canvas X 16 (Windows 7) this past June I noticed that the JPEGs created by Canvas are partially corrupted. On my office iMac, the icons for JPEGs generated in Canvas are the generic JPEG icon on the Mac instead of a preview of the image. Also, if I attempt to view Canvas-generated JPEGs, Preview give the following error message:

    The file “{filename}” could not be opened. It may be damaged or use a file format that Preview doesn’t recognize.

    OS X does in fact recognize that these image files are JPEGs, as the file kind is shown as “JPEG Image” in the Info window for these files, but the image preview in the Info dialog is also the generic JPEG icon just as in the Finder. For the project I was working on in June I was able to use GraphicConverter to convert the JPEG into a JPEG; the process resulted in files that were fully recognized in OS X.

    Previously, with Canvas 12 this issue did not appear because I was running Windows 7 on a Dell. That installation was virtualized when the Dell hardware failed and is now run in a VM in OS X with a shared file system. Just to be sure, I created a JPEG in Canvas 12 and the result was the same; an image file that cannot be previewed in OS X.

    The JPEG image file format is not platform-dependent and I should not have had to buy another product to repair JPEGs generated in Canvas so that they can be previewed in OS X’s Finder; not that GraphicConverter does not have its uses. One of the reasons I am a long-time Canvas user, even after ACD abandoned the designers’ platform of choice, is because it is one of the few graphics applications that handles a very wide range of graphics file formats.
    Hopefully this will be rectified in a future update.

  • #2
    When you're in the Save As window, change the file name tag to .jpg and see if that helps.

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    • #3
      I generally use the Export to JPEG feature in the Properties Bar, as it is quicker doing a single click than going to Save As..., selecting a file type, and selecting Save Selection—I am almost always saving a rendered image and not the entire document when exporting to an image file format—to get to the Export Image dialog. In the Export Image dialog, I always make sure that I have the .jpg extension when naming the file.
      Last edited by mdawson69; 09-29-2015, 01:34 AM.

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      • #4
        Canvas support got back to me and could not replicate the issue. Based on the tech support response, I did some further investigation and it appears that the issue is associated with optimizing the size of exported JPEGs. I typically select Optimize Size because most of the reports that I author are lengthy and contain several figures. Transmitting documents via e-mail becomes problematic once the file size exceeds a few megabytes.* When I generated a JPEG from Canvas without optimizing the size, there were no issues with the files in OS X; optimizing the file size has no negative impact in Windows.

        *I find it interesting that in the age of multi-terabyte storage, most e-mail services still balk at attachments that are more than about 10 MB or so.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mdawson69 View Post
          *I find it interesting that in the age of multi-terabyte storage, most e-mail services still balk at attachments that are more than about 10 MB or so.
          Helps keep other stuff moving faster.

          I support store on server, provide link approach.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Joe Hren View Post
            Helps keep other stuff moving faster.

            I support store on server, provide link approach.
            Unfortunately, it is not up to us to decide how we transmit documents to our clients, as our client is the federal government. Our clients within the government do have file servers, but very few people in this company work in government spaces where they would have access to those servers. External access is very limited for obvious reasons and the nature of our work is falls under “public trust” and not “classified”.

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            • #7
              I never use optimize when exporting a jpg from Canvas. I render the item in Canvas, then use Resolution to size it according to what the recipient needs, then export.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by mdawson69 View Post

                Unfortunately, it is not up to us to decide how we transmit documents to our clients, as our client is the federal government. Our clients within the government do have file servers, but very few people in this company work in government spaces where they would have access to those servers. External access is very limited for obvious reasons and the nature of our work is falls under “public trust” and not “classified”.
                I understand! Dealing with the government can be a total PITA... even though it is OUR government.

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