Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

ACDSee 2018 Masks

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ACDSee 2018 Masks

    I have been trying to learn about masks in edit mode. I have read through the help about masks, but despite following the steps I cannot work out what they are meant too do or even how to create them.

    I thought I was getting somewhere today, but every time I try to use an adjustment either nothing happens or the image gets covered in gray and white squares.

    Can anybody help me out or point me towards a tutorial that explains masks and their purpose.

    Thanks, John

  • #2
    Maybe as a starting ;point... Go to acdsee.com... then go to" Communities"... Typing in "mask" into the search field narrows video to those that include the benefits and how-to's

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by GusPanella View Post
      Maybe as a starting ;point... Go to acdsee.com... then go to" Communities"... Typing in "mask" into the search field narrows video to those that include the benefits and how-to's

      Thanks for that info. I am pretty new to photography and photo editing software, so I do not fully understand some of the terminology that is used. I did as you suggested and went through each video and while some of them do do mention masks it is usually limited to 'Create a layer mask', but the video doesn't say what to do with it or why it is supposed to do. I did see one video that included a parrot and I understood the 'make mask from selection'. So is that all a mask can do? just superimpose an image over another?

      Surely there is more to a mask as I have seen some videos that say they can be used to make adjustment to an image but none that show how to do that, and everytime I try that nothing changes or the image turns into gray and white squares.

      I guess at this time I will just have to stick to develop mode only.

      Thanks for your help, John

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi

        ​An introduction to masks is given in the manual, chapter "edit mode", sections "use of masks with layers" (not sure of translation, sorry, this is taken from the French version...).
        ​Previons sections "use of layers" and "use of adjustment layers" (save caveat...) are interesting as well.

        ​Of course, Gus' suggestion is very useful too.

        ​However, those are just introductory material, nothing will save you from trying and failing, and then succeeding ;-)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jpu018 View Post
          Hi

          ​An introduction to masks is given in the manual, chapter "edit mode", sections "use of masks with layers"
          I have read the section of the help manual but even though I have followed the steps it does not seem to work.

          I find the help and the tutorials are aimed at those who are familiar with photo editing software and as a result the steps are not explain in enough detail and the terminology used can be confusing to a new person like myself that has only started using the software in the last couple of months.

          I do not think I will bother with masks anymore and just stick to basic editing. I am also having problems with the software becoming unresponsive at times, and if I cannot find a solution to that problem I will probably go back to using the editing software that came with the camera.

          You help was appreciated, Thanks.

          Comment


          • #6
            Basically a mask sits on top of another layer and effects which parts of it are visible. The most important thing to understand is that the color you chose to paint on to the mask effects the opacity of layer beneath. When painting on the mask you will either use white, black, or shades of gray - often times all three. When you paint with white the layer beneath is completely visible, whereas if you paint with black then nothing is visible, and painting with gray will be somewhat visible and varies depending on the shade of gray. When you use 'Adjustment Layers' in the bottom right-hand corner they automatically come with a mask enabled which is displayed as a white box - initially if you make any changes it applies to the entire image because the mask is white.

            In the attached screenshot, I added a vibrance adjustment layer and then set the Saturation to -100 (i.e. the photo would be completely monochrome). I then selected the paintbrush tool and set the color to black, and making sure I selected the mask on the adjustment layer (there will be a white box around it) began to paint. On the far left-hand side I painted in all black so none of the vibrance adjustment layer shows in that section of the photo - notice how it's fully colored. Next I set the color to gray and painted the middle section - notice how it's about 50% saturated. Finally I set the color to white and painted the right-hand section - it's completely monochrome because the full effect of the vibrance adjustment layer is showing through.

            Masks are extremely versatile since they allow you to make adjustments that effect only a particular area of your photo. For example if you have a landscape photo that is overexposed in the sky, you could apply an exposure/levels/curves adjustment layer to reduce reduce the exposure, painting the sky with white to get the full effect of the adjustment, while painting the rest of the photo in black so those parts don't become underexposed. I find that since PSU2018 has added Pixel Targeting to adjustment layers that's often the easiest and best way to start a mask and I'll then use the paintbrush to fine tune. If you're not familiar with Pixel Targeting it basically allows you to create a mask based on either tones (luminosity) or colors - often I'll want to apply an adjustment to only shadows or highlights so I'll use this to quickly accomplish that instead of manually going in and painting the mask on those parts of the photo. My best suggestion is to play around it with and watch some masking videos on Youtube - it seems complicated at first but once it clicks you'll be using it all the time.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by bmcnich; 01-06-2018, 08:36 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              There are ACDSee workshop videos on youtube, very good at explaining the editing concepts to beginners.
              Workshop 3 & 4 includes masks concept. Very long videos, but worth it!
              In our seventh ACDSee Workshop we're going to be experiencing ACDSee Ultimate 10 through the eyes of a beginner. If you're new to ACDSee products, or new to ...

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bmcnich View Post
                Basically a mask sits on top of another layer and effects which parts of it are visible. The most important thing to understand is that the color you chose to paint on to the mask effects the opacity of layer beneath. When painting on the mask you will either use white, black, or shades of gray - often times all three. My best suggestion is to play around it with and watch some masking videos on Youtube - it seems complicated at first but once it clicks you'll be using it all the time.
                Thank heaps for your excellent explanation of masks and the attached image. I now think I am beginning to understand masks and what they can be used for. I tried to replicate the effects shown in your attached image but It seemed to be working in reverse. It was only when I re read you explanation many time did I notice that you had said to set the Saturation to -100. I was setting it to +100 and when I set the saturation correctly everything worked as you said. I now feel that I am staring to grasp the concept of masks and and maybe I should learn to read things better.

                I tried another image this time using an exposure adjustment layer and I successfully managed to increase the exposure to some background trees while leaving the foreground properly exposed.
                have been stressing out trying to understand masks and now, thanks to your detailed post my stress levels have dropped considerably.

                Thanks very much.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by HakanThn View Post
                  There are ACDSee workshop videos on youtube, very good at explaining the editing concepts to beginners.
                  Workshop 3 & 4 includes masks concept. Very long videos, but worth it!

                  Thanks for that advice and link. I will look for those youtube videos and will watch them regardless of how long they are. I am going to learn masks regardless of how long it takes.

                  Thanks heaps.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X