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ACDSee Ultimate edit mode: rotating an image is slow

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Greyfox View Post

    There is ACDSee Ultimate, ACDSee Pro and ACDSee Home. AFAIK there is no "Ultimate Pro".
    But that aside, where did you get the idea that ACDSee can't index (I suspect you mean Catalog) more than 50,000 images).
    Right, sorry for the confusion -- I have Ultimate 2021. What gave me that idea about the 50K images is that I wrote to their tech support to tell them that ACDSee would simply not complete catalog my entire collection. It would encounter an error and with a message saying it has to close. And that was the agent's reply -- try indexing just 50,000 images at a time. He said if I try the 2022 version, it should be more stable.

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    • #17
      So cataloguing image hives in chunks is advisable by the support team. . . . [big sigh] Who am I to criticise this.
      In the past I've seen builds that always crashed before cataloguing <20.000 items on several different pc's (incl fresh virtual machines).

      But we are hijacking a thread!

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      • #18
        Well....I found out something interesting. I'm using a Synology NAS for my photo collection, and that, I discovered, is a huge factor in the read/write speed. It didn't occur to me it would make such a difference, but it does. I tested rotating some images on my local SSD drive, and the speeds were, as Greyfox and Framon mentioned, about 1-2 seconds each image, which is what I would expect. Even though the NAS is a 9200 RPM system, it's still no match for an SSD. I just thought that the rotation processing would somehow happen locally in true batch fashion, but it looks like it works through the batch rotation by opening, processing and saving one image at a time, which, with a network delay and conventional HDD speeds, just go at a turtle's pace. I'll just have to live with it, it appears.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Gecko9 View Post
          Well....I found out something interesting. I'm using a Synology NAS for my photo collection, and that, I discovered, is a huge factor in the read/write speed. It didn't occur to me it would make such a difference, but it does. I tested rotating some images on my local SSD drive, and the speeds were, as Greyfox and Framon mentioned, about 1-2 seconds each image, which is what I would expect. Even though the NAS is a 9200 RPM system, it's still no match for an SSD. I just thought that the rotation processing would somehow happen locally in true batch fashion, but it looks like it works through the batch rotation by opening, processing and saving one image at a time, which, with a network delay and conventional HDD speeds, just go at a turtle's pace. I'll just have to live with it, it appears.
          Thanks for posting back with that. At least it identifies why our results were so different, and may help others who are using network storage for their collections.
          Can I ask whether your PC to NAS connection is via Ethernet or WiFi ?

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          • #20
            I was wondering about that too. I ran the batch rotate both ways, and I didn't notice much of a difference. I think most of the delay is due to the files being on a network drive, whether Wi-Fi or wired. I forgot to mention in the last post that I spent some time chatting with a Synology agent, and that the time it took to do the rotate processing was within specs for an NAS setup like that.

            Another method I tried that worked great was to copy all the files I needed rotated to a temporary folder on my local SSD drive, blaze through all the rotations there, and copy them back to their original location on the NAS. Doing all of that is still way faster than waiting through dozens of rotate processes at 20-30 seconds each. For some reason, straight copying/saving a bunch of files to the NAS is still much faster than trying to process them in place on the NAS.

            My guess about how this works is that ACDSee has to pull the image into RAM to process it, so when working with network storage, it has to retrieve it, load it into memory, process it and save it back to the network drive, and if there's a delay at every one of those points, plus the slow NAS HDD speed compared to SSD, it just all adds up to a long wait.

            It would be so cool if there was a way to write a script that would take a bunch of selected files and apply my method of copying and processing them locally on SSD and then saving then back to NAS, but I don't have the skills for that.

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            • #21
              Wifi is much slower than wires which is much slower than local disks (wether SSD or not, of course SSD is faster).

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              • #22
                Greyfox I never noticed your last question -- my PC to NAS connection is by Ethernet. That was part of my frustration with the rotation speeds. I thought the wired connection would greatly accelerate it. I have found my temp local folder solution for rotating files is the fastest workaround.

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                • #23
                  ******SOLUTION*******

                  I finally discovered the cause of the delay in rotating files. It not only affected that, but also the building of thumbnails and cataloging files. The issue was that I use a KVM switch to use my work laptop and my personal laptop with a single large monitor, and part of the setup includes a USB Ethernet adapter that's connected to that KVM, so that both laptops can use the same wired connection. The trouble is, it creates some kind of a hiccup in the read/write process. As soon as I directly wired my laptop to the Ethernet port, the speed increased dramatically in all functions -- rotating, building thumbnails, cataloging -- to what I would consider "normal".

                  Problem solved! Thanks again to all who kept trying to help me troubleshoot this.

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