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How "non-destructive" is ACDSee Ultimate 2020?

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  • njlarsen
    replied
    Originally posted by rienvanham View Post
    You're right GUS. I'm not a professional, just a "holiday"-photographer. Since about a year I have a camera which saves in raw.

    My "workflow" is:
    - I have a tree with al my photo's; ordened in folders per year/date. I call this "original photo's";
    - I want to create copies with a crop of 16*9 to show them om my (UHD) TV via nVidia Shield.

    Snip
    If that is the only use you have of the "developed" image then you absolutely do not need to worry about the loss of size of the image! Having said that, I think in your situation, I would either use a "batch save as" function to change a whole folder into the 16:9 size you want, or if you want to individually determine where the crop is going to be, I would use "save a copy" to determine a new folder for each changed format image and then just not save changes when prompted afterwards. In that way, you will have one folder showing your native jpg images and another with the 16:9 images which makes it cleaner when you then show on the TV.

    I agree with Gus's explanation of the original jpg still being there if you need later to revert to it.

    Niels

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  • GusPanella
    replied

    I almost exclusively use RAW files in Develop Mode. These are never overwritten. The changes are written to the XML file (if you have ACD set this way). then the file is re-rendered every time it is opened to those setiings. In my mind, this is truly non-destructive.

    [side note: I start digital photography around 2002 and shot in JPG for about 5-8 years... I really wish I would have kept the RAW files in the early years. At the time I did not understand RAW vs JPG... and the software tools to do RAW were less user friendly than those that did only JPG... or at least that is how it felt at the time]

    Lets get back into the original post....
    When I use TIF or JPG in Develop Mode, the original file gets tucked away in a hidden folder named [originals]. Thus, if you restore original, the edited file is replaced by the original, so in a sense, you never loose the original, therefore is is not destroyed... or at least that is how I've interpreted the marketing collateral of ACD and others. If you subsequently use the "Commit Changes" option, the orginal is the thrown out (recovering disk space) and you are left with the last edit.

    I guess ACD could keep the JPG edits in the XML file, too... I am guessing that having to export an edited JPG may be more confusing. Imagine using another tool to look at the JPG file, but not seeing the edits you may have done in ACD... that would be confusing, too. So I guess I understand the reasoning behind keeping an original file in a folder for safe keeping.

    Even in Edit Mode, the RAW file is never touched... If you want to save something, it is either export to a typical file format (TIF, JPG) or saving as a .acdc file.


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  • mogle
    replied
    You might find \Batch\Convert Files\ useful. You can convert to all sort of file formats. The Advanced Settings allow you to set some Source Resolution. Your questions tells me you might find that useful.

    Other \Batch\Functionalities are also useful.

    When working on Development or Edit mode you can use Save As and save the file under different name and format.

    Personally I find it useful to keep the RAW files in a separate subfolder called \raw\. When I import files to my photo repository I always set the setting where the raw files are added to a subfolder.

    Leave a comment:


  • rienvanham
    replied
    You're right GUS. I'm not a professional, just a "holiday"-photographer. Since about a year I have a camera which saves in raw.

    My "workflow" is:
    - I have a tree with al my photo's; ordened in folders per year/date. I call this "original photo's";
    - I want to create copies with a crop of 16*9 to show them om my (UHD) TV via nVidia Shield.
    - Therefore I tried to do it with Capture One Pro (but I can't understand why people want to work with such a buggy product); I upgraded ACDsee to Ultimate 2020;
    - Alex (is that the name of the guy who presents the courses on YouTube?) states that Develop is "non-destructive" (but that isn'tactually true, right?);

    Is it possible por ACDsee to wright the changes in a sidecar-file (XMP) (for JPG's) and leave the original file untouched?

    Leave a comment:


  • GusPanella
    replied
    Re-running JPGs through another JPG compression routine tends to degrade the image on subsequent saves (may be the reason for "almost 100%"), thus it is somewhat destructive. In the case of "restore" the original image is returned.

    FWIW, when editing files, I tend to stay away from JPGs because of the destructive save process associated with any JPG save (admittedly a bit OCD).

    Leave a comment:


  • rienvanham
    replied
    Mmm, strange advise.... you both suggest to not process the image and leave it original? I found a solution! ACDSee seems to save JPG's with a quality of about 95%. But I want 100%. This can be done via a weird route:
    select a photo
    Select "View" (third tab)
    Select File -> Save as
    Select "Options..."
    Image quality -> 100%
    Select "Save these settings as the defaults".
    Select "OK"

    Now the files are saved in almost 100% of the original.

    Leave a comment:


  • njlarsen
    replied
    The quality settings when you save a jpg determines how big the file is afterwards. The 5.998.100 bytes you report afterwards is probably fine as long as you are not expecting to do other edits at a later date. If that is your intent, then do not save as jpg, or better yet, start over with the original jpg as Gus described.

    Niels

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  • GusPanella
    replied
    For JPGs
    Manage Mode > Rt. Click on image > Restore Original

    For RAW files, just the side car file is updated.

    Leave a comment:


  • rienvanham
    started a topic How "non-destructive" is ACDSee Ultimate 2020?

    How "non-destructive" is ACDSee Ultimate 2020?

    I've done some simple testing:

    Original photo, JPG, 17.229.660 bytes
    Go to DEVELOP, Geometry, Crop 16 * 9, Done!

    Now my file is 5.998.100 bytes

    Is this non-destructive? It is 65% smaller.....

    Or what am I doing wrong?

    Thanks in advance!
    Rien van Ham
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