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Using same database on two devices (home-networked)

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  • #16
    Originally posted by LV_Bill View Post
    Over a decade ago (with some help from Marc Sabatella), I changed my workflow to a totally decentralized architecture. Originally, I had a master networked image database (at my Studio), and I struggled with the multiple PC's each with their own copy of ACDSee, and each with their own "database", plus my home and travel systems. Finally, I reversed direction, and started keeping a separate and duplicate image library on each of my PC's (Studio, Home, and Travel). Duplicating the image library for each PC may sound primitive and almost amateurish. But, in reality, with all the ACD metadata embedded in the images themselves, it's really easy the sync the image libraries. And, with embedded metadata, when you sync the images, you effectively sync the databases at the same time.
    Hi Bill,

    Your solution sounds good for my purposes. Can you explain the sync-ing process to novice like myself? Or point me to a good resource? The Help file doesn't really tell me what is actually going on when I sync.


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    • #17
      Hi John - For file syncing the multiple copies of my master image library, I do use a separate software package. There are a lot of file sync packages available, but I have had the best results with one called AllwaySync. For moving between locations and different PC's, my workflow is pretty straightforward.

      When I'm done working on my images on one particular PC, I always finish with the same two step process. (1.) In ACDSee, embed metadata using the command: Tools > Metadata > Embed ACDSee Metadata > Embed in All Files. (2.) Run AllwaySync to backup my image library from that PC to a portable backup drive. For serious shoots or for overseas trips, I carry two Samsung 850 500gb SSD backup drives.

      To startup work on another PC at another location, I simply reverse the process. I use AllwaySync to upload from the backup SSD to sync the next PC's image library. Then I run: Tools > Database > Catalog Files. That's it. Let me wrap up this discussion with a word of caution. File sync software is very powerful, and you must pay very close attention to what you are doing. It is not too difficult to accidentally sync in the wrong direction, and lose precious data.

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      • #18
        Hi John,

        I use GoodSync to synchronise my files with backup copies on external drives. You do have to take care when initially setting up the sync tasks to get the right results, and then as LV_Bill has said pay close attention after the analysis run as to what it intends to do, but once you have done it a few times, it isn't difficult..

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        • #19
          Originally posted by LV_Bill View Post
          To startup work on another PC at another location, I simply reverse the process. I use AllwaySync to upload from the backup SSD to sync the next PC's image library. Then I run: Tools > Database > Catalog Files. That's it. Let me wrap up this discussion with a word of caution. File sync software is very powerful, and you must pay very close attention to what you are doing. It is not too difficult to accidentally sync in the wrong direction, and lose precious data.
          This sounds like what I'm already doing. I use a third-party app to back up my desktop SSD every night, and restore it every morning to my laptop. My problem is that files I might delete on one computer don't get deleted on the other (unless I hunt them down manually). I was hoping that file syncing might deal with this automatically.

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          • #20
            Hi John - What you are doing should work.....as long as you are doing the "right" kind of sync. Some sync operations try to merge the source and destination files. This is NOT the way to go in my opinion. I recommend that you perform a one-way sync that makes the destination drive look identical to the source drive. A key setting in your software to differentiate a merge sync from to true backup sync may be called something like propagate deletions. And, as mentioned earlier, if you embed your metadata, it will travel with your images on the backup drive.

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            • #21
              LV_Bill

              The reason why I ask. There actually exists an easy method for a shareable hierarchical tag, It's the "shotrcuts" pane, which is just a pointer to a local folder. It's easy to link this folder to a network share which all installations of AC can manage at the same time by adding just short ĺinks (.LNK) to files located on shares too. The downside is, it's not possible to use the AC search functions to find the folder names used in the shortcuts pane if you use short ĺinks.



              Imho import/export of meta data currently is completely messed up in AC. Here's a comparison:
              Easiest way to import
              The tag
              How to export
              the tag into the files
              EXIF Browsing the files (3)
              IPTC Browsing the files Return key or
              ‘Apply‘ Button
              XMP Browsing the files Return key or
              ‘Apply‘ Button
              simple AC tags (1) Browsing the files Embedding
              hierarchical AC tags (2) Cataloguing Embedding
              1 Description, Autor, Remark, Label
              2 AC_Keywords, Categories, Collections
              3 not needed, imho doesn‘t make sense
              The worst thing is the need of cataloguing to read hierarchical AC tags. By browsing the files everything seems correct at first. If you don't look closely you will not notice the missing category/collections/AC-keywords assignments.

              There's more but I think it's enough blaming for now.

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