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Developing interior images with windows in them

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  • Developing interior images with windows in them

    How do I mask off windows in interior shots such that when I increase the room exposure, the highlights don't blow the windows out? Presumably there is a way to do it with image stacking, but I just want to mask off a window, re-expose the rest of the shot and then unmask the window again.

  • #2
    Hello,

    If you are using ACDSee Ultimate the easiest workflow would be as following:

    1. Take the image in Edit mode.
    2. Add an Exposure Adjustment layer. See the screenshot below.

    Click image for larger version

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    3. Increase the exposure in the Adjustment layer.
    4. With a black paint brush draw on the mask to hide the effect of the adjustment layer on the windows.

    Hope this helps.

    Regards,

    Shakil H.
    ACD Systems

    Comment


    • #3
      While Shakil's suggestion is probably the cleanest and best approach, it requires that you use the Edit Mode. If you prefer the Develop Mode, another approach is to use Light EQ. Select Light EQ in it's Standard Mode, place your cursor on a dark part of the room's interior, hold the left mouse button down, and slide the mouse up (or down) until the darks get brighter. Usually, this helps considerably without affecting the bright areas (windows). Conversely, brighter areas can be made darker. Same approach, just use right mouse button instead.

      Comment


      • #4

        Thanks Shakil, for the prompt reply. I was with you through to Step 4;
        Did you mean this brush? And how do I merge the layers when complete?
        Click image for larger version

Name:	Clipboard01.jpg
Views:	48
Size:	109.8 KB
ID:	53652

        Originally posted by S.hussain View Post
        Hello,

        If you are using ACDSee Ultimate the easiest workflow would be as following:

        1. Take the image in Edit mode.
        2. Add an Exposure Adjustment layer. See the screenshot below.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot.jpg
Views:	60
Size:	667.1 KB
ID:	53648
        3. Increase the exposure in the Adjustment layer.
        4. With a black paint brush draw on the mask to hide the effect of the adjustment layer on the windows.

        Hope this helps.

        Regards,

        Shakil H.
        ACD Systems

        Comment


        • #5
          Reeka,
          This is a great tip, and is so quick and easy I might rely on it. It doesn't seem to result in quite as good an image as the mask but is, as they say, "close enough for government work".
          Thank you for taking the time to share.

          Originally posted by Reeka View Post
          While Shakil's suggestion is probably the cleanest and best approach, it requires that you use the Edit Mode. If you prefer the Develop Mode, another approach is to use Light EQ. Select Light EQ in it's Standard Mode, place your cursor on a dark part of the room's interior, hold the left mouse button down, and slide the mouse up (or down) until the darks get brighter. Usually, this helps considerably without affecting the bright areas (windows). Conversely, brighter areas can be made darker. Same approach, just use right mouse button instead.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Glasseye View Post
            Thanks Shakil, for the prompt reply. I was with you through to Step 4;
            Did you mean this brush? And how do I merge the layers when complete?
            Click image for larger version

Name:	Clipboard01.jpg
Views:	48
Size:	109.8 KB
ID:	53652


            Hi,

            Yes, you can use that brush to paint the areas that you don't want to be affected by the adjustment layer. I can see from your screenshot that the windows have simple structures, you can use the polygon selection tool to outline the windows before adding the adjustment layer and then invert the mask.

            You can save the result in ACDC format, this retains all the layers, so if you want to tweak the image further at a later time you have that option.

            Under the adjustment layer icons there is a Merge Layer Down option right beside the trash can icon, you can use that to merge layers down. Alternatively, this option is also available under the layer drop down menu.

            Also saving the files in any format other than ACDC flattens/merges all layers.

            Sincerely,

            Shakil H.
            ACD Systems

            Comment

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