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ACDSee vs. inbuilt ipad pro photo editing - Brilliance

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  • ACDSee vs. inbuilt ipad pro photo editing - Brilliance

    I'd like to talk here about only one single feature of the ipad Pro’s normal inbuilt photo editor.
    t’s a slider called “Brilliance” (with a range of -100 --> 100)

    I often quite like the effect that the slider has on a typical image on the ipad screen, and would like to ask if anyone can sort of describe in “ACDSee terms” what that Brilliance slider is doing to an image?
    Reason is, of course, that I’d like to do something similar with my ACDSee U2022.
    I mean a description like “increasing shadows adding & contrast”
    Maybe someone here has used both and has an idea about how to do this easily in ACDSee?

    This is a basic description I found on an apple support page:

    Brilliance: Adjusts a photo to make it look richer and more vibrant, brightening dark areas, pulling in highlights and adding contrast to reveal hidden detail.
    The adjustment is colour neutral (no saturation is applied), but there may be a perceived change in colour because brighter images with more contrast appear more vibrant.


    Thanks
    Trevor

  • #2
    Trevor

    The effect can be achieved by a combination of a number of individual adjustments, for example in ACDSee perhaps Light EQ, Tone Curve, Vibrance, Clarity, and Contrast adjustments.

    With a "canned" single slider function the amount of the individual adjustments is determined by the program algorithm, and the slider only controls how much of the overall effect is applied.

    In ACDSee Ultimate Develop mode, you can create a preset which includes a combination of individual adjustments, but there is no single slider to control how much of the overall effect is applied.

    In ACDSee Ultimate Edit mode, you can record an action which duplicates the base layer, then applies a combination of individual adjustments from the left hand filter panel to the duplicated layer.

    When you replay the action, you can then use the opacity control for the duplicated layer to control how much of the effect is applied.

    If you build the recorded action using Adjustment layers, then not only can you still set the overall amount of the effect with the opacity slider of the duplicated layer, but you can subsequently tweak any of the individual adjustments if necessary, with the bonus of being able to quickly and simply use the adjustment layer masks to further control the effect.
    Last edited by Greyfox; 03-21-2022, 01:41 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Greyfox View Post
      Trevor

      The effect can be achieved by a combination of a number of individual adjustments, for example in ACDSee perhaps Light EQ, Tone Curve, Vibrance, Clarity, and Contrast adjustments.

      With a "canned" single slider function the amount of the individual adjustments is determined by the program algorithm, and the slider only controls how much of the overall effect is applied.

      In ACDSee Ultimate Develop mode, you can create a preset which includes a combination of individual adjustments, but there is no single slider to control how much of the overall effect is applied.

      In ACDSee Ultimate Edit mode, you can record an action which duplicates the base layer, then applies a combination of individual adjustments from the left hand filter panel to the duplicated layer.

      When you replay the action, you can then use the opacity control for the duplicated layer to control how much of the effect is applied.

      If you build the recorded action using Adjustment layers, then not only can you still set the overall amount of the effect with the opacity slider of the duplicated layer, but you can subsequently tweak any of the individual adjustments if necessary, with the bonus of being able to quickly and simply use the adjustment layer masks to further control the effect.
      Thanks Greyfox
      That sounds quite complicated :-(
      I usually only use develop mode, which limits my possibilties somewhat.
      I think I was looking more for a description of exactly what those "combination of individual adjustments" is actually doing, but perhaps it's too difficult to reverse engineer Apple's "canned" single slider.
      Trevor

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      • #4
        Trevor

        There is an article on the iPad Brilliance control here https://pocketshutterbug.com/article...hone-and-ipad/

        Here is a comparison of the before and after screen shots used in that article.

        Click image for larger version

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        I've taken the screen shot of the original, and in ACDSee Develop mode created a relatively simple custom preset to give something of the same effect.

        Click image for larger version

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        The custom preset can then be used on any image with a single click.

        The settings used for the preset.

        Tone Curve:
        The clipped tones warning, and the histogram in Develop mode showed some clipping of the shadows, so a vary minor correction was made to the tone curve to correct the clipping. For the purpose of this exercise, leaving out this particular adjustment would probably not make a visual difference.

        LightEQ
        Shadows +11, Midtones +30, Highlights 0

        General
        Exposure -30, Highlights 0, Fill light 10, Contrast +40, Saturation 0, Vibrance +15, Clarity +50, Dehaze 0

        The above saved as custom preset.

        As I mentioned in my previous post, these settings work for that particular image, but will almost certainly not optimum for every image, and in Develop Mode there is no opacity slider to adjust the level of the applied preset, but you can apply the preset and then tweak the individual settings.

        In Edit mode, recording a similar set of Adjustments (from the layers pane) on a duplicate layer, would again allow it to be run on any image, with the advantage that the duplicated layers opacity control could then be used to apply a variable level of the change.

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        • #5
          @ Greyfox
          Thanks for taking a closer look, I guess in short, you could say that increasing "Brilliance" is like "adding light" to the image with a bit more contrast (and "POP") thown in.
          I guess it is similar in a way to the pp I often manually do with the develop mode of ACDSee.

          ...thinking a bit more generally it is probbaly the combination of all these sliders, and how we individually use them for particular images, that defines a persons photgraphic pp "style"

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