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  • Export images

    I have many old photos that have been digitized from 35mm film rolls.

    They have been scanned to 1600ppi and saved in tiff format.

    When I do a Batch-Export in the same format, they end up as 72ppi ?

    In the Export Presets, I have only selected Specific Folder, and rest is unselected.

    I would have assumed the image would have been Exported in its original format.

    Any help as always appreciated, thanks

  • #2
    bwest

    In your export presets, you need to set the PPI to what you prefer. I have all of my saved presets set to 300dpi so it will be in effect the default. I can then temporarily change it when required for special cases.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	PPI.jpg Views:	0 Size:	125.5 KB ID:	60683
    Last edited by Greyfox; 05-14-2022, 11:53 PM.

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    • #3
      Thanks Greyfox,

      I have used this but discovered that the Export Resolution is "capped" at 999 ppi.
      I was trying to get a true copy of multiple images from one folder to another.
      If I use "Copy to folder" I get two instances of the same images in the catalog.
      Of course I could manually remove them from the catalog but with some 4,000 images it becomes very time consuming.
      I'm probably missing something somewhere.
      Thanks for your help again,

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bwest View Post
        I have used this but discovered that the Export Resolution is "capped" at 999 ppi.
        Correct.

        I was trying to get a true copy of multiple images from one folder to another.
        If I use "Copy to folder" I get two instances of the same images in the catalog.
        Of course I could manually remove them from the catalog but with some 4,000 images it becomes very time consuming.
        I'm probably missing something somewhere.
        If you want to copy images from one folder to another, but not have the images in the destination folder added to the database, before you copy the files, right click on the destination folder and select "Exclude from database". When you then copy the files, no records will be created for the destination files. (It doesn't remove any metadata that is embedded in the images, just doesn't create any database records for them).

        Back to ppi.
        35mm slides are scanned at relatively high ppi, because we know that the image will be viewed or printed at a much larger size than the original 34mmx 23mm viewable area of a 35mm Kodachrome slide.

        Having scanned the slide at your 1600 ppi, the image exported from the scanner would be something in the order of 2141 x 1448 pixels. So I'll use that size as an example.

        The ppi reference is then arguably of no further importance. You can't view the image at 1600 ppi on your monitor (the view resolution is set by the resolution of the monitor itself, which for example is 99ppi on my monitors) and I doubt you would want a 34mm x 23mm print of the image (the size it would print if you printed it at 1600dpi).

        When you open that image in ACDSee and export it using the Export dialog, and assuming you don't specifically resize the image, the pixel size of the image doesn't change (using the example above it would be 2141 x 1448 px) regardless of what you set the ppi/dpi to in the export dialog.

        If you print that image using "fit to page" on 6" x 4" photo paper, the resolution of the print is going to be something in the order of 356 dpi, again regardless of the ppi value. The only time the ppi/dpi value becomes relevant is when you want to print to scale.
        Last edited by Greyfox; 05-15-2022, 07:31 PM.

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        • #5
          Hi Greyfox,

          Thank you so much for your help.

          The explanation you have provided makes sense.

          I must admit I never thought of "Exclude from database"

          Thanks again,

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