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Does my PC need updating?

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  • Does my PC need updating?

    I use ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2022. I rarely use RAW files as they take ages to process - it's common for the screen to go black for about 20 seconds when saving an edited RAW file. Also, when editing JPEGs, ACDSee gets very "jerky" and the slider bars do not respond smoothly. I use a PC.
    Here are ACDSee's system requirements, with my PC straight after in capitals:

    Processor: Intel i5 INTEL CORE i5-4460 [email protected]
    RAM: 8GB 16GB
    Vram: 512MB 1024 MB
    Graphics: DirectX 10 Compatible NVIDIA GEFORCE GT610 (Full support for Direct 11)
    Display: 1920 x 1080 1920 x 1080

    My PC was made for me in 2015, so may well be out of date.
    As such, my questions are:
    1) Is it out of date?
    2) What are the weak spots?
    3) Is there any way of re-configuring my machine to boost ACDSee's performance?
    4) If I get a new PC built to my specs, what should I go for? 90% of my usage is ACDSee editing (stills only, I rarely take videos), the rest is email, Word and the odd Excel document.

    Any advice/opinions hugely appreciated, thanks, Andy from England.

  • #2
    Originally posted by AndyH View Post
    I use ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2022. I rarely use RAW files as they take ages to process - it's common for the screen to go black for about 20 seconds when saving an edited RAW file. Also, when editing JPEGs, ACDSee gets very "jerky" and the slider bars do not respond smoothly.

    My PC was made for me in 2015, so may well be out of date.
    As such, my questions are:
    1) Is it out of date?
    2) What are the weak spots?
    3) Is there any way of re-configuring my machine to boost ACDSee's performance?
    4) If I get a new PC built to my specs, what should I go for? 90% of my usage is ACDSee editing (stills only, I rarely take videos), the rest is email, Word and the odd Excel document.

    Any advice/opinions hugely appreciated,
    Your PC is approx 7 years old so of course it is not the latest and greatest. But 12 months (or even less) after you purchase a new one, it will no longer be the latest and greatest either.

    Almost certainly a new PC with a current series motherboard, a higher performance CPU, more and probably faster RAM, M.2 NVMe SSD drives. a better graphics card and most likely Windows 11 would provide an improvement in performance, but at a price.

    If your PC is a desktop, you could weigh up whether for you the purchase of a new PC would be a better overall option than perhaps upgrading some areas of your current PC. For instance if the current local drives are spinning platter hard drives, you could reduce read and write times by replacing them with SSD drives, and you could look at a better graphics card. To perhaps a lesser extent you could perhaps improve performance by increasing the amount of RAM.

    It's likely that your present motherboard won't support M.2 NVMe SSD drives, but even changing to SATA SSD's should provide better performance than spinning platter hard drives. You can Google a comparison of your current GT610 graphics card against higher performance graphics cards to get an idea of cost versus performance for different types, When you look at graphics cards though, you may need to consider whether your current power supply can provide the power and connections needed for the card.

    If you are saving your images to an external USB2 hard drive, you could improve data transfer rates by replacing it with a USB3 one (providing there is a USB3 port available on your PC), but that would still be slower than having the working images on a local SSD.

    In the end though it is a personal choice as to whether the cost of updating parts of your current PC, or purchasing a complete new PC can be justified against the likely saving in your time, or perhaps by a reduction in frustration..

    Don't overlook that perhaps some simple housekeeping might improve the current performance at little or no cost. Defragging hard drives, reducing unnecessary background and foreground tasks, perhaps increasing the size of your paging file, making sure your database is kept optimized, and minimizing the effect of antivirus and anti-malware software on ACDSee processing, to name a few.

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